The Rise of Deaf Architecture

The Rise of Deaf Architecture

Deaf people use space very differently from hearing people. Can our buildings, sidewalks and markets finally reflect that?

WIn the spring of 2005, a two-day workshop took place on the Gallaudet University campus in Northeast Washington that was to change the way the world’s only university for the deaf and hard-of-hearing engaged with architecture and design. About 20 attendees — a collection of teachers, students and administrators — gathered with architect and designer Hansel Bauman to provide input on a new campus building, the Sorenson Language and Communication Center (SLCC). It would house the school’s audiology booths, its lab for visual language and visual learning, a center focused on speech and hearing, and the linguistics department.

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